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David Haskell: The Forest Unseen
A biologist reveals the secret world hidden in a single square meter of forest
MONDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2014, 07:00 PM
Chautauqua Community House
$12.00 ($9.00 Member)
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Written with remarkable grace and empathy, the award-winning "The Forest Unseen" is a grand tour of nature in all its profundity.

Biologist David George Haskell uses a one-square-meter patch of old-growth Tennessee forest as a window onto the entire natural world. Visiting it almost daily for one year to trace nature's path through the seasons, he brings the forest and its inhabitants to vivid life. Beginning with simple observations--a salamander scuttling across the leaf litter, the first blossom of spring wildflowers—Haskell spins a brilliant web of biology, ecology, and poetry, explaining the science binding together ecosystems that have cycled for thousands, sometimes millions, of years.

Haskell's research is supported by the National Science Foundation, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Fish and Wildlife Service, the World Wildlife Fund and the Templeton Foundation.

 

 

David Haskell: The Forest Unseen

Paolo Bacigalupi: The Doubt Factory
MONDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2014, 07:00 PM
Chautauqua Community House
$12.00 ($9.00 Chautauqua Concert Member), $7.00 high school students
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Bring your teens and join Paolo Bacigalupi for the release of his newest Young Reader novel "The Doubt Factory." In this page-turning contemporary thriller, Mr. Bacigalupi, a National Book Award Finalist, Printz Award Winner and New York Times bestselling author, explores the timely issue of how public information is distorted for monetary gain, and how those who exploit it must be stopped.

In "The Doubt Factory," everything Alix knows about her life is a lie. At least that's what a mysterious young man who's stalking her keeps saying. But then she begins investigating the disturbing claims he makes against her father. Could her dad really be at the helm of a firm that distorts the truth and covers up wrongdoing by hugely profitable corporations that have allowed innocent victims to die? Is it possible that her father is the bad guy, and that the undeniably alluring criminal who calls himself Moses—and his radical band of teen activists—is right?


Mr. Bacigalupi will read from and talk about writing young reader books, answer questions and sign his books. Read more here...

 

 

Paolo Bacigalupi: The Doubt Factory

Holistic Approaches to Early Education- The Spirit of Childhood
Chautauqua Education Series
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2014, 07:00 PM
Chautauqua Community House
$10.00 ($7.00 Member), Six event package: $54.00 ($36.00 Member)
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What is the general value of early education and how does it set the stage for long term, life- long success?  Michael Girodo, Head of School at Jarrow Montessori will discuss a variety of methods and philosophies of early education that address foundations for success including Montessori, Waldorf and Regio Emilla.

Purchase six event package ($54/$36 Member) here.

 

 

 

Holistic Approaches to Early Education- The Spirit of Childhood

Nicholas Carr: The Glass Cage
Automation and Us
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2014, 07:00 PM
Chautauqua Community House
$12.00 ($9.00 Member)
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Back by popular demand, Nicholas Carr presents his newly released book “The Glass Cage” (September 2014).

The book explores the impact of automation from a deeply human perspective, examining the personal as well as the economic consequences of our growing dependence on computers. Carr digs behind the headlines about factory robots and self-driving cars, wearable computers and digitized medicine, as he explores the hidden costs of granting software dominion over our work and our leisure. Even as they bring ease to our lives, these programs are stealing something essential from us.

From nineteenth-century textile mills to the cockpits of modern jets, from the frozen hunting grounds of Inuit tribes to the sterile landscapes of GPS maps, Carr takes us on a journey from the work and early theory of Adam Smith and Alfred North Whitehead to the latest research into human attention, memory, and happiness, culminating in a moving meditation on how we can use technology to expand the human experience.  Read more here.

 

 

Nicholas Carr: The Glass Cage

Kepler's Search for New Worlds
Chautauqua Space Series
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2014, 07:00 PM
Chautauqua Community House
$10.00 ($7.00 Member)
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From the dawn of civilization humanity has wondered, are there other worlds out there like Earth that could support life? NASA’s Kepler Mission, launched in 2009, has answered at least part of this question by discovering 962 planets, over 2,900 planet candidates and the first Earth size planet orbiting its star in the habitable zone. But the Kepler mission is much more than just discovering planets. Kepler’s larger purpose is to statistically determine the prevalence of Earth size planets orbiting sun like stars in the zone where liquid water could exist throughout our entire galaxy.  John Troeltzsch, Ball Aerospace Kepler program manager, will discuss how Kepler was designed and built and provide a summary of what it has found out about our galaxy including the newest discovery of 186f, which appears to be very Earth-like.

 

Kepler's Search for New Worlds

Engaging Children's Emotions in Learning
Chautauqua Education Series
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2014, 07:00 PM
Chautauqua Community House
$10.00 ($7.00 Member)
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What does it mean to embrace children’s emotional lives as productive aspects of their academic and social experiences? Whether or not they are invited, stories from life experiences, including stories of trauma, do enter classrooms and other sites of learning. Children’s deeply felt experiences can either be harnessed as resources or discouraged as distractions–a choice that has important implications for students’ opportunities to thrive.

Based on years of research with students and teachers, CU Professor Elizabeth Dutro will reveal that the stakes are high in how stories of emotional experiences are incorporated into the act of learning. Dutro will draw upon children’s voices and stories to explore questions about what it means to invite, recognize, and carry these experiences in any learning setting.

 

 

Engaging Children's Emotions in Learning

Rachel Weaver: Point of Direction
MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2014, 07:00 PM
Chautauqua Community House
$10.00 ($7.00 Member)
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Hitchhiking her way through Alaska, a young woman named Anna is picked up by Kyle, a fisherman. Anna and Kyle quickly fall for each other, as they are both adventurous, fiercely independent and in love with the raw beauty and solitude of Alaska. To cement their relationship, they agree to become caretakers of a remote lighthouse perched on a small rock in the middle of a deep channel—a place that has been uninhabited since the last caretaker mysteriously disappeared two decades ago. What seems the perfect adventure for these two quickly unravels, as closely-held secrets pull them apart and the surrounding waters threaten uncertain danger. Set against the uniquely rugged landscape of coastal Alaska, "Point of Direction" is an exquisite literary debut.

 

 

Rachel Weaver: Point of Direction

How Children's Interests Develop
Chautauqua Education Series
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2014, 07:00 PM
Chautauqua Community House
$10.00 ($7.00 Member)
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Interest and learning go hand in hand. When children and adolescents are deeply interested in a topic, they actively seek out ways to learn more about it. In turn, their growing knowledge helps deepen their interest. CU Professor Bill Penuel will describe what research reveals about how children’s interests develop in and out of school and the role that social supports play in helping young people find activities that captivate and sustain their attention over time. Penuel will discuss ways that parents, teachers and the community can support the cycle in which interest and understanding can grow together, with emphasis on the middle grades and adolescence—when interest in many school subjects tends to decline.

 

 

How Children's Interests Develop

New Horizons to the Pluto System
Chautauqua Space Series
MONDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2014, 07:00 PM
Chautauqua Community House
$10.00 ($7.00 Member)
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New Horizons is NASA's mission to explore the Pluto system and explore the frontier of our solar system including the Kuiper Belt. The spacecraft, launched January 19, 2006, will begin its encounter studies of Pluto in early 2015, culminating on July 14, 2015 with a close approach just 12,500 km from Pluto.
The spacecraft carries sophisticated panchromatic and color imagers, IR and UV mapping spectrometers, a radio science package, two in situ plasma instruments and a dust counter.

 

 

 

New Horizons to the Pluto System

Peter Heller: The Painter
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 14, 2015, 07:00 PM
Chautauqua Community House
$10.00 ($7.00 Concert Members)
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Following up on the success of "The Dog Stars," his post-apocalyptic literary debut of 2012, Peter Heller now pivots in a slightly different direction with "The Painter" — a contemporary Western about a 45-year-old artist and fly fisherman named Jim Stegner. Having lost two wives to divorce and his only daughter to violence, Stegner has felt the sting of life; but he’s also capable of experiencing great beauty, whether through his art, his relationships, or while out casting on a river. Heller skillfully balances these two sides of his protagonist, painting a portrait of a man whose dark edge can explode in unexpected ways (the first line of The Painter is "I never imagined I would shoot a man”).

Peter Heller is an award-winning adventure writer and the author of four books of literary nonfiction. His books include "Hell or High Water: Surviving Tibet's Tsangpo River," "The Whale Warriors: The Battle at the Bottom of the World to Save the Planet's Largest Mammals," and "What Surfing Taught Me about Love, Life, and Catching the Perfect Wave."  Peter is also a longtime contributor to NPR, a contributing editor at Outside Magazine and Men's Journal, and a frequent contributor to Businessweek.


 

Peter Heller: The Painter

Literacy Squared: Valuing Bilingualism
Chautauqua Education Series
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 21, 2015, 07:00 PM
Chautauqua Community House
$10.00 ($7.00 Member)
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There are over 10 million children in the U.S. speaking languages other than English, 85% of whom speak Spanish as their other language. These children have enormous potential, but historically have not been well served by U.S. schools. In addition, school programs provided only in English often result in both Spanish language loss and a missed opportunity to foster bilingualism and intercultural understanding among all children.. CU professors Kathy Escamilla, Lucinda Soltero-González, & Sue Hopewell will discuss Literacy Squared®—a program designed to accelerate the development of English as well as maintain and develop Spanish in emerging bilingual children—as well as suggest research-based strategies to make the most of the rich multicultural resources of children in the U.S. and encourage bilingual literacy.

 

 

Literacy Squared: Valuing Bilingualism

Search for our Cosmic Origins
Chautauqua Space Series
MONDAY, JANUARY 26, 2015, 07:00 PM
Chautauqua Community House
$10.00 ($7.00 Member)
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New measurements of the acceleration of the universe, precise measurements of the light from the moment the universe became transparent, and mapping of the distribution of matter on cosmic scales have revolutionized the search for our cosmic origins. This new information has led to a model of the universe in which 95% of the mass/energy in the universe exists as dark matter and dark energy, neither of which has ever been directly measured in a laboratory, only inferred from astronomical observations. Professor James Green will outline the observational case for the current cosmological paradigm, placing it in the context of Einstein’s theory of general relativity and will detail the development of the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS). COS was the last instrument installed in the Hubble space telescope during the final servicing mission in 2009 and was developed and built in Boulder by CU and Ball Aerospace.

 

Search for our Cosmic Origins

Mark Bekoff: Rewilding Our Hearts
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2015, 07:00 PM
Chautauqua Community House
$10.00 ($7.00 Member)
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In wildlife conservation work, rewilding — to make wild once again — refers to the creation of corridors between preserved lands that allow declining populations to rebound. In "Rewilding Our Hearts" (September 2014) Mark Bekoff applies the concept of rewilding to human attitudes, arguing that unless humans rewild themselves, becoming profoundly reconnected to nature and fundamentally shifting their consciousness,  conservation efforts will have but limited impact.

"Rewilding Our Hearts" explores how when the effort is made to not just see, but to empathetically become “the seen,” our perspective on animals and their habitats changes in profound ways. Bekoff is the author of over 26 books, including his latest "The Emotional Lives of Animals." Read more here.

 

Mark Bekoff: Rewilding Our Hearts

How Children Learn Math and Science
Chautauqua Education Series
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2015, 07:00 PM
Chautauqua Community House
$10.00 ($7.00 Member)
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Math and science are often thought of as challenging subjects that can prevent children from being successful in school. However, many aspects of math and science resonate well with students’ hearts and minds. New teaching and learning practices have changed the look of math and science and these novel formats are often unfamiliar to parents, students, and educators. CU Professors Edd Taylor & Valerie Otero will reveal aspects of math and science learning environments that are inviting and empowering and demonstrate how math and science appeal to curiosity and problem-solving instincts.Taylor and Otero will also discuss the rationale for current changes in math and science classrooms (e.g. solving problems in non-traditional ways), as well as the changing roles for parents in this somewhat unfamiliar space.

 

 

How Children Learn Math and Science

Where has Curiosity Taken Us?
Chautauqua Space Series
MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2015, 07:00 PM
Chautauqua Community House
$10.00 ($7.00 Member)
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Humans have been curious about the universe since they were capable of looking up. A lot has been learned in the last few decades but there is still much to discover. Mobile labs including the Curiosity rover on Mars are extensions of human eyes and hands, testing the red planet's surface to see what it's like, what it once was and whether it could have ever supported life. Phil Plait PHD, will discuss just where Curiosity has taken us.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Where has Curiosity Taken Us?

Exploring the Universe from the Moon
Chautauqua Space Series
MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2015, 07:00 PM
Chautauqua Community House
$10.00 ($7.00 Member)
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How researchers are able to explore the universe from the moon has changed dramatically since the end of NASA’s Apollo missions. Over the last decade, new spacecraft have orbited the Moon, gathered new data and provided insights into the origin of the Earth’s nearest neighbor. Water ice has been discovered inside craters at the poles of the Moon. This new information has re-established the Moon as a more important destination for space exploration and as a stepping stone to human missions to Mars. Professor Jack O. Burns, Ph.D will describe research on a new radio telescope for the radio-quiet lunar far side—operating at frequencies below the FM radio band—that will allow scientists to probe the birth of the first stars and galaxies in the early universe. The Moon holds the keys to understanding how the Earth-Moon system formed along with the origin of the first objects to “light up” the Universe.

 

 

Exploring the Universe from the Moon

Standardized Testing and Special Needs
Chautauqua Education Series
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2015, 07:00 PM
Chautauqua Community House
$10.00 ($7.00 Member)
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There is considerable controversy over the use of standardized tests to assess academic progress of children with special needs. The very act of standardization appears to conflict with the tailoring of a student’s learning goals through an individualized education plan (IEP). Some also argue that the process of preparing students to take a standardized test takes away valuable time that could be spent on more authentic learning activities. Professor Derek Briggs will discuss the pros and cons of standardized testing for children with special needs. He will also explore the features of the newly designed large-scale assessments that all Colorado students will be taking in the spring of 2015 and discuss how these features may address frequently raised concerns about standardized testing.

 

 

Standardized Testing and Special Needs

Katie Singer: An Electronic Silent Spring
TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2015, 07:00 PM
Chautauqua Community House
$10.00 ($7.00 Concert Members)
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Over millions of years, living creatures have evolved in relation to the Earth's electromagnetic energy. Now, we're surrounded by human-made frequencies that challenge our health and survival. Katie Singer’s “An Electric Silent Spring” reports the effects of electrification and wireless devices on people, plants, bee colonies, and frogs around the globe. It also presents solutions for people who want to reduce their exposure to electromagnetic radiation.


In addition to discussing EMR exposure and solutions for individuals and communities that want to reduce their emissions and their exposure, Singer will reveal the significant developments that have taken place in the year since her book's publication, including her landmark report, "Calming Behavior in Children with Autism and ADHD."

 

 

Katie Singer: An Electronic Silent Spring

The Violent Life of Massive Stars
Chautauqua Space Series
MONDAY, APRIL 13, 2015, 07:00 PM
Chautauqua Community House
$10.00 ($7.00 Member)
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From birth to black holes massive stars light up and drive the evolution of galaxies, forge most of the chemical elements on the periodic table during their brief, luminous, and violent lives, and die in supernova explosions that create neutron stars and black holes. Professor John Bally will demonstrate massive star birth, evolution and demise with the latest images from our ground and space-based observatories. Bally is a professor in the Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy (CASA) at the University of Colorado, Boulder.

 

 

The Violent Life of Massive Stars

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